Conference Agenda

MAST Med 2022 Grand Hyatt, Central Athens, Greece

Thu 3 Nov 2022

11:30 Thu 3 Nov 2022

11:30–13:00

3C: Undersea

Mine Countermeasures - New operations/Technologies

Impact35: Optimisation of the Navy’s 3-D Mine Impact Burial Prediction Simulation Model (Using High-Order Numerical Methods)

  • Mr Thanasis Donas
    Phd Candidate
    University of West Attica
    Greece

The aim of this paper is to present an application of high-order numerical analysis methods to the Navy’s three-dimensional mine impact burial prediction model, Impact35, which models the movement of a cylindrical-shaped object (mine, projectile, etc.) in a marine environment, with important applications in Naval and Maritime Security operations. The simulation system Impact35 manufactured by the N.P.S (Naval Postgraduate School) and predicts the behavior of UXOs (UneXplode Ordnances), by estimating the buried depth and buried volume of projectiles. This information is crucial, both for the safe conduct of coastal activities and for the collection of projectiles after Navy exercises. More specifically, if the burial depth and the buried volume is below a certain limit it is possible, due to environmental phenomena (sediment erosion, extreme wave heights etc.), mines to emerge on the surface, causing severe damage. Additionally, the model provides the position and velocity of the object at each time of its movement, enhancing the process of finding and collecting the projectiles and as a result can also be used in search and rescue activities, increasing the operational capabilities of the Navy and the Coast Guard on security and control issues. Under this framework, our objective is to introduce an alternative methodology, for the dynamics of the model, based on the Dormand–Prince Runge–Kutta fifth-order and the singly diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta fifth-order methods, in order to meliorate both the time efficiency of the system and the accuracy of the predicted parameters.

Assessment of Automatic Target Recognition in Mine Hunting; Command, Control and Communication (C3) of Autonomous Vehicles in the Sub-surface Domain

  • Dr Michael Roberts
    Senior Human Factors Specialist
    QinetiQ
    United Kingdom

This paper describes an exploration of Human Autonomy Teaming in relation to adaptive (i.e., operators trigger changes to control mode) and adaptable (i.e., system triggers changes to control mode) control modes. As part of an ongoing program of research focussed on autonomous vehicles in the maritime domain (i.e., Maritime Autonomous PLatform Exploitation (MAPLE)), this paper reports an assessment of Command, Control and Communication (C3) activities associated with sub-surface Unmanned Vehicles (UxV), obtained during a ‘Mine Hunting’ experimental scenario.

The assessment described in this paper includes summary analysis of the Instantaneous Assessment of Workload (ISA), and Trust Questionnaires, as well as qualitative data, obtained from Royal Navy personnel and Military Advisors in relation to sub-surface UxV C3 User Interface functionality. This paper utilises both quantitative and qualitative methodologies to analyse ratings, comments and observations.

The main findings are presented in terms of the differences between adaptive vs. adaptable task control, with the main aim of seeking to understand advantages / disadvantages of each type of control mode in the sub-surface mine hunting domain. In general, this experimental work demonstrates that Military personnel prefer to be in control of triggering shifts in level of autonomy (i.e. adaptable) and that ATR can be implemented successfully, certainly for the sub-surface mine warfare environment. Additionally, this paper will describe the next steps in the ongoing MAPLE research program. Specifically an upcoming series of experiments, which will further inform human machine tasking / role allocation and elucidate the HF considerations associated with UxV C3.

Signature Management Domain Within New Polish Minehunter Project

  • Mr Pawel Polanski
    Chief Specialist (Physicist)
    CTM (R&D Marine Technology Centre)
    Poland

Poland is in the process of acquisition of three new mine countermeasures (MCM) vessels of Kormoran II type. Programme consists of already commissioned first of the type ORP Kormoran minehunter (MH) and two subsequent ships which are under the trials or will begin trials shortly i.e. OORP Albatros and Mewa. As all naval ships need to follow signature management standards like NATO’s AMP-14 and relevant Polish national standards that state requirements for underwater magnetic and electric signatures, great care was put from the beginning of the project to assure meeting strict field limits for these MCM vessels.

With respect to magnetic signature significant part of its reduction – so called passive reduction - was done through proper upfront design i.e. choice of non- or low-magnetic materials for hull and special low-magnetic versions of equipment to be installed on board. These techniques were aimed at elimination of sources of magnetic field. The remaining field is actively cancelled using local and ship degaussing system (DG, active technique) by generation of magnetic field of similar shape and magnitude but with opposite polarity. Efficient DG was designed using experience from past projects and with the help of PSM, FEM and analytical models. Currently works are continued to extend open loop degaussing system (OLDG) into closed loop (CLDG) operation.

Reduction of electric field that is performed by the same impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system protecting the hull against corrosion was also aided from the beginning of the programme with extensive PSM, analytical, FEM modelling and feedback introduced after the first ship.

Models were developed for both signatures that estimate in real time current signature levels and distribution basing on measurements from both systems. This data is available to the crew to be used in MCM operations.

Paper presents developments of signature managements systems within the programme including design considerations, trade-offs, laboratory and analytical works and development of CLDG and its data exchange with CMS. Factors influencing reduction level on laboratory and ship sides as well as signature range side are discussed.


Marta Czarnowska M.Sc., Franciszek Szarkowski M.Sc.

Michal Narozny Ph.D, Pawel Polanski M.Sc.

R&D Marine Technology Centre S.A. Dickmana 62, 81-109 Gdynia, Poland

Tel: +48 735 999 529

Email: [email protected]

Developing New Modeling Schemes for a Navy’s mine Impact Burial Prediction Model

  • Professor George Galanis
    Professor
    Hellenic Naval Academy
    Greece

Authors:

Athanasios Donas1, Ioannis Famelis1, Peter C Chu2 and

George Galanis3

1microSENSES Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Electronics

Engineering, University of West Attica, Egaleo, Greece

2Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory, US Naval Postgraduate

School, Monterey, California, USA

3Mathematical Modeling and Applications Laboratory, Hellenic Naval

Academy, Hatzikiriakion, Piraeus, Greece


The aim of this paper is to present an application of high-order numerical analysis schemes to the Navy’s three-dimensional mine impact burial prediction model Impact35, which models the movement of a cylindrical-shaped object (mine, etc.) in a marine environment, with important applications in Naval and Maritime Security operations.

The latest version of the simulation system as developed by the US Naval Postgraduate School, predicts the behavior of UXOs (UneXplode Ordnances), by estimating the buried depth and volume of projectiles. This information is crucial, both for the safe conduct of coastal activities and for the collection of projectiles after Navy exercises. More specifically, if the burial depth and the buried volume is below a certain limit it is possible, due to environmental phenomena (sediment erosion, extreme wave heights etc.), mines to emerge on the surface increasing the risk of potentially harmful incidents.

Additionally, the model simulates the position and velocity of the object at each time of its movement, supporting the process of finding and collecting the projectiles. As a result, it can also be used in search and rescue activities, increasing the operational capabilities of the Navy and the Coast Guard on security and control issues.

Within this framework, our objective is to introduce an alternative methodology for the dynamics of the model, based on the Dormand–Prince Runge–Kutta fifth-order and the singly diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta fifth-order methods, in order to meliorate both the time efficiency of the system and the accuracy of the predicted parameters.

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